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29 Quotes from Lessons in Chemistry book by Bonnie Garmus

Hello. I am Deepak Kundu, an avid book reader and quotes collector. Here is a list of 29 quotes that I liked and saved while reading Lessons in Chemistry book by Bonnie Garmus. I hope you enjoy reading them.

Lessons in Chemistry Quotes

Food is the catalyst that unlocks our brains, binds our families, and determines our futures. And yet … does anyone have the time to teach the entire nation to make food that matters? I wish I did, but I don’t. Do you? – Lessons in Chemistry book by Bonnie Garmus

Look, life has never been fair, and yet you continue to operate as if it is—as if once you get a few wrongs straightened out, everything else will fall into place. They won’t. You want my advice? Don’t work the system. Outsmart it. – Lessons in Chemistry book by Bonnie Garmus

It’s a lot easier to have faith in something you can’t see, can’t touch, can’t explain, and can’t change, rather than to have faith in something you actually can. One’s self, I mean. – Lessons in Chemistry book by Bonnie Garmus

When one is raised on a steady diet of sorrow, it’s hard to imagine that others might have had an even larger serving. – Lessons in Chemistry book by Bonnie Garmus

Cooking is serious science. In fact, it’s chemistry. – Lessons in Chemistry book by Bonnie Garmus

Many people go to breeders to find a dog, and others to the pound, but sometimes, especially when it’s really meant to be, the right dog finds you. – Lessons in Chemistry book by Bonnie Garmus

Sometimes I think the animals we consider animals are far more advanced than the animals we are but don’t consider ourselves to be. – Lessons in Chemistry book by Bonnie Garmus

Life wasn’t a hypothesis one could test and retest without consequence—something always crashed eventually. – Lessons in Chemistry book by Bonnie Garmus

Humans were strange, the way they constantly battled dirt in their aboveground world, but after death willingly entombed themselves in it. – Lessons in Chemistry book by Bonnie Garmus

That’s how it is with research—it’s at the mercy of those who pay for it. – Lessons in Chemistry book by Bonnie Garmus

Losing a loved one has a way of revealing a too-simple truth: that time, as people often claimed but never heeded, really was precious. – Lessons in Chemistry book by Bonnie Garmus

We tend to treat pregnancy as the most common condition in the world—as ordinary as stubbing a toe—when the truth is, it’s like getting hit by a truck. Although obviously a truck causes less damage. – Lessons in Chemistry book by Bonnie Garmus

Funny, isn’t it? A man writes a book about things of which he has absolutely no firsthand knowledge—childbirth and its aftermath, I mean—and yet: boom. Bestseller. My suspicion? His wife wrote the whole thing, then put his name on it. A man’s name gives it more authority, don’t you think? – Lessons in Chemistry book by Bonnie Garmus

Do you hate advice givers? I do. They have a way of making one feel inadequate. And the advice is usually lousy. – Lessons in Chemistry book by Bonnie Garmus

While stupid people may not know they’re stupid because they’re stupid, surely unattractive people must know they’re unattractive because of mirrors. – Lessons in Chemistry book by Bonnie Garmus

Names mattered more than the gender, more than tradition, more than whatever sounded nice. A name defined a person. It was a personal flag one waved the rest of one’s life; it had to be right. – Lessons in Chemistry book by Bonnie Garmus

Being an adult is overrated, don’t you think? Just as you solve one problem, ten more pull up. – Lessons in Chemistry book by Bonnie Garmus

Having a baby was a little like living with a visitor from a distant planet. There was a certain amount of give and take as the visitor learned your ways and you learned theirs, but gradually their ways faded and your ways stuck. – Lessons in Chemistry book by Bonnie Garmus

What I find interesting about rowing is that it’s always done backwards. It’s almost as if the sport itself is trying to teach us not to get ahead of ourselves. – Lessons in Chemistry book by Bonnie Garmus

When you think about it, rowing is almost exactly like raising kids. Both require patience, endurance, strength, and commitment. And neither allow us to see where we’re going—only where we’ve been. – Lessons in Chemistry book by Bonnie Garmus

Life’s a mystery, isn’t it? People who try and plan it inevitably end up disappointed. – Lessons in Chemistry book by Bonnie Garmus

Cooking is chemistry. And chemistry is life. Your ability to change everything—including yourself—starts here. – Lessons in Chemistry book by Bonnie Garmus

The problem with being a minister was how many times a day he had to lie. This was because people needed constant reassurance that things were okay or were going to be okay instead of the more obvious reality that things were bad and were only going to get worse. – Lessons in Chemistry book by Bonnie Garmus

Often the best way to deal with the bad is to turn it on end—use it as a strength, refuse to allow the bad thing to define you. Fight it. – Lessons in Chemistry book by Bonnie Garmus

Say what you want about the human race, their capacity for kindness was what put them over the top, species-wise. – Lessons in Chemistry book by Bonnie Garmus

Sometimes I think that if a man were to spend a day being a woman in America, he wouldn’t make it past noon. – Lessons in Chemistry book by Bonnie Garmus

Don’t let the public tell your story for you. They have a way of twisting the truth. – Lessons in Chemistry book by Bonnie Garmus

Too many brilliant minds are kept from scientific research thanks to ignorant biases like gender and race. It infuriates me and it should infuriate you. Science has big problems to solve: famine, disease, extinction. And those who purposefully close the door to others using self-serving, outdated cultural notions are not only dishonest, they’re knowingly lazy. – Lessons in Chemistry book by Bonnie Garmus

Whenever you start doubting yourself, whenever you feel afraid, just remember. Courage is the root of change—and change is what we’re chemically designed to do. So when you wake up tomorrow, make this pledge. No more holding yourself back. No more subscribing to others’ opinions of what you can and cannot achieve. And no more allowing anyone to pigeonhole you into useless categories of sex, race, economic status, and religion. Do not allow your talents to lie dormant, ladies. Design your own future. When you go home today, ask yourself what you will change. And then get started. – Lessons in Chemistry book by Bonnie Garmus

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